Pamper My Dog Articles Archives

I took tscale_1_2his straight from the Shelter Pups website because i think it's a worthy cause and i really want to help these beautiful creatures. Send them a picture of your puppy and they would make you a stuffed one.The money goes to help shelter animals

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article-2072963-0F10631100000578-326_634x495If your "expectant puppy mother" does not have enough milk to feed her little ones, then here is some advice to help her along the way.

Ultrasound might be able to give you an idea of how many puppies to expect. There are always surprises on whelping day, and not having enough milk, is just one of them.

But first, the Main Causes of Aglactia (no milk production) in a Dog are:

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Teaching your puppy from jumping up is something that you need to do as soon as possible.

DogJumpingYour dog might just be excited and being a little too friendly – but if they jump up on people and cannot be controlled, it can be a nuisance or  even a problem.

If someone is all dressed up  and the dog jumps  on them, it could annoy them and potentially even damage their clothing – not something you really want to do to your guests! It’s also important to note that some people are nervous of dogs and you shouldn’t allow your dog to frighten people. Just because you know that he “won’t do any harm”, that doesn’t mean that the other person knows. So it’s best to keep the dog under control and make allowances for others’ feelings.

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  A Memory Foam Dog Beds You and Your Dog would absolutely enjoy

This is not a review per se , it's just a bed that my dogs and i love and i just thought i would  share it with you all.Every one that i know who bought this bed absolutely loves it.So here goes

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wet

Spending the day having fun in the water with your dog is always a lot of fun! Yes it really is. Most breeds love water. It’s the disturbing smell coming from a wet dog that causes a fun experience to turn dull. Why do most dogs smell so bad when they get wet?

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body

If you want your dog to live a long and happy life, you need to know how to maintain its health. In order to do so, you need to understand how the body of your pet works.  It is important to know how the organs of your dog function in order to be prepared for any medical problems that may occur and solve them in a timely manner. Here are some signs that are indicative of a problem that your pal is having:

Ears. Here are some of the major problems which you may need to face:

  • Allergies
  • Infections
  • Debris inside
  • Parasites
  • Trauma
  • Hormone disorders

In order to avoid these problems, you can keep water out of the ear’s canals, keep the ears of your dog dry at all times, groom your dog under its ear flaps, do not pluck out hair from the ear canal, regularly and gently wipe off accumulation of wax, dirt, or debris, and use a cleaning solution for redness.

  • Eyes.
  • Cataracts
  • Corneal ulcers
  • Infection
  • In-growing eyelids
  • Injuries
  • Irritation
  • Pink eye

To prevent these problems from occurring, use blunt-nose scissors to trim excessive hair around the eyes while removing any foreign objects and matted hair. Use a cotton ball and saline solution to clean mucus. Use a tear-stain remover to clean stains around the eyes, common in some breeds like poodles, for example.

  • Mouth. By the age of 3, most dogs have some signs of gum disease. Here are some other problems they may experience:
  • Bad breath
  • Gingivitis
  • Periodontal disease

The solutions to these medical issues are: daily dental canine brushing and rinsing, routine oral check-ups by a vet, proper diet with dry food, as well as dental care chew toys and treats.

smallNow you can get chewable  pet tabs that’s all natural and healthy

pet

Doggie-LanguageDo you know How To Read Your Dog's Body Language

Body Language Basics

What is your dog trying to tell you? Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures.

Understanding what your dog is saying can give you a lot of useful information, such as when your dog is spooked and nervous about what is going on, or when your dog is edgy and might be ready to snap at someone. You do have to look at the dog's face and his whole body.

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THE COLOR OF THE NAILS HAS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO DO WITH THEIR BLOODLINE OR GENES…THIS IS A MYTH, IN FACT ITS SO STUPID ITS NOT EVEN ONE! DO YOUR RESEARCH! DON’T BELIEVE PHONY BREEDERS WHO UTTERS NONSENSE!
“THE COLOR OF A DOG’S NAIL IS DETERMINED BY THE

COLOR OF THE SURROUNDING SKIN AND HAIR”
I hope this info will help you learn how to trim dog nails.

dog_nails2

 

 

 

Trimming your dog’s nails is not just a part of grooming, but is important for your dog’s health as well. Untrimmed nails can cause a variety of problems including broken nails that are painful and bleed profusely. In some cases, nails will actually curl and grow back into the dog’s feet.
 

A good indication that dogs’ nails are too long is a telltale ‘click-click-click’ when walking on uncarpeted areas; and it’s time to trim dog nails.
 

How many of us put off trimming our dog’s nails until the inevitable veterinary check-up comes around and the veterinarian must do it? If you are like many pet owners, you may be hesitant to trim your dog’s nails because you are afraid of cutting the quick of the nail, which may cause pain or bleeding. Once you learn how to do it, clipping your dog’s nails is almost as easy as clipping your own.
 

When you are trimming your dog’s nails, you are only cutting away the excess. Recognizing what is excess and where the nerves and blood vessels begin is what you need to know to make nail trimming a painless process for both you and your dog.

How to trim dog nails:

Assemble what you will need – a high quality pair of trimmers and some styptic powder, such as Kwik-Stop, CutStop Styptic Pads, or other product to stop bleeding if you nick the quick.
You may want to sit on the floor with your dog, hold your dog in your lap, or have someone hold your dog on a table. Hold your dogs’s paw firmly and push on his pads to extend the nail. Locate where the quick ends. With clear or light nails, it is easy to see the pink color where the quick ends.
 

Using a nail trimmer for dogs, cut the nail below the quick on a 45-degree angle, with the cutting end of the nail clipper toward the end of the nail. You will be cutting off the finer point. In dogs, especially those with dark nails, make several small nips with the clippers instead of one larger one. Trim very thin slices off the end of the nail until you see a black dot appear towards the center of the nail when you look at it head on. This is the start of the quick that you want to avoid. The good news is that, the more diligent you are about trimming, the more the quick will regress into the nail, allowing you to cut shorter each time.
 

In some cases, if the nails are brittle, the cut may tend to splinter the nail. In these cases, file the nail in a sweeping motion starting from the back of the nail and following the curve to the tip. Several strokes will remove any burrs and leave the nail smooth.
 

If your dog will tolerate it, do all four feet this way. If he will not, take a break. And do not forget the dewclaws. On most breeds, if they have not been removed, dewclaws are 1-4″ above the feet on the inner side of the legs. If not trimmed, dewclaws can grow so long they curl up and grow into the soft tissue , like a painful ingrown toe nail.
 

If you accidentally cut the quick, wipe off the blood and apply Kwik-Stop or styptic powder to stop the bleeding. It is not serious and will heal in a very short time.
 

Some valuable tips:
 

Remember, it is better to trim a small amount on a regular basis than to try and remove large portions. Try to trim dog nails weekly, even if long walks keep them naturally short. The ‘quick,’ a blood vessel that runs down the middle of your dog’s nail, grows as the nail grows, so if you wait a long time between cuttings, the quick will be closer to the end of the nail. This means more likelihood of bleeding during trimming.
Trim nails so that when the dog steps down, nails do not touch the floor.
Invest in a good pair of nail trimmers in an appropriate size for your dog. They can last a lifetime.
 

Make trimming time fun and not a struggle.

Trimming your dog’s nails does not have to be a chore or unpleasant. If your dog is not used to having his nails trimmed, start slowly and gradually work up to simply holding his toes firmly for 15-30 seconds. Do not let him mouth or bite at you. It can take daily handling for a week or more to get some dogs used to this. When your dog tolerates having his feet held, clip just one nail, and if he is good, praise him and give him a tiny treat. Wait, and then at another time, do another nail. Continue until all nails have been trimmed. Slowly, you will be able to cut several nails in one sitting, and finally all the nails in one session.
With black nails, trim dogs nails slightly frequently since you cannot see the quick. Make small trims each time to make the blood vessel retract slowly.
 

Trimming your dog’s nails is not just a part of grooming, but is important for your dog’s health as well. Untrimmed nails can cause a variety of problems including broken nails that are painful and bleed profusely. In some cases, nails will actually curl and grow back into the dog’s feet.
 

A good indication that dogs’ nails are too long is a telltale ‘click-click-click’ when walking on uncarpeted areas.
Clipping a pet's nailsHow many of us put off trimming our dog’s nails until the inevitable veterinary check-up comes around and the veterinarian must do it? If you are like many pet owners, you may be hesitant to trim your dog’s nails because you are afraid of cutting the quick of the nail, which may cause pain or bleeding. Once you learn how to do it, clipping your dog’s nails is almost as easy as clipping your own.
 

When you are trimming your dog’s nails, you are only cutting away the excess. Recognizing what is excess and where the nerves and blood vessels begin is what you need to know to make nail trimming a painless process for both you and your dog.
 

To trim your dog’s nails:
 

Assemble what you will need – a high quality pair of trimmers and some styptic powder, such as Kwik-Stop, CutStop Styptic Pads, or other product to stop bleeding if you nick the quick.
You may want to sit on the floor with your dog, hold your dog in your lap, or have someone hold your dog on a table. Hold your dogs’s paw firmly and push on his pads to extend the nail. Locate where the quick ends. With clear or light nails, it is easy to see the pink color where the quick ends.
 

Using a nail trimmer for dogs, cut the nail below the quick on a 45-degree angle, with the cutting end of the nail clipper toward the end of the nail. You will be cutting off the finer point. In dogs, especially those with dark nails, make several small nips with the clippers instead of one larger one. Trim very thin slices off the end of the nail until you see a black dot appear towards the center of the nail when you look at it head on.

This is the start of the quick that you want to avoid. The good news is that, the more diligent you are about trimming, the more the quick will regress into the nail, allowing you to cut shorter each time.
 

In some cases, if the nails are brittle, the cut may tend to splinter the nail. In these cases, file the nail in a sweeping motion starting from the back of the nail and following the curve to the tip. Several strokes will remove any burrs and leave the nail smooth.
 

If your dog will tolerate it, do all four feet this way. If he will not, take a break. And do not forget the dewclaws. On most breeds, if they have not been removed, dewclaws are 1-4″ above the feet on the inner side of the legs. If not trimmed, dewclaws can grow so long they curl up and grow into the soft tissue, like a painful ingrown toe nail.
 

If you accidentally cut the quick, wipe off the blood and apply Kwik-Stop or styptic powder to stop the bleeding. It is not serious and will heal in a very short time.

I hope this info will help you learn how to trim dog nails.

 

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If you looking for a really good dog nail clippers.Take a look at these.Just click the image

SIC

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In a perfect world, we could protect our dogs from negative, anxious and frightening situations. In the real world, we must help our dogs learn how to cope and respond, in a healthy and acceptable manner, to the spectrum of people, animals, places and things they might encounter along the road of life.

By exposing our dogs to different kinds of people, animals and environments, which involves everything from dog obedience classes to vet visits to walks to the parsocializingyourdog17x22k, we can help them develop confidence and ease. This goes a long way in helping them become resilient in the face of unsettling situations.

So often, the way a dog responds to environmental stimuli is a product of owner training and management, or lack thereof. No matter when you adopt your dog, you can apply canine socialization principles to help him or her be a more stable, happy, trustworthy companion.

Socialization does not end at puppyhood. While the foundation for good behavior is laid during the first few months, good owners encourage and reinforce social skills and responsiveness to commands throughout the dog’s life.

If you are a dog owner, you are probably aware of the importance of socializing your puppy. Dogs have a sensitive period for socialization between the ages of 3 and 12 weeks. This means that pleasant exposures to people, other dogs and other animals during this time will have long-lasting influences on the sociability of your dog. Well socialized dogs tend to be friendlier and less fearful of the kinds of individuals they were socialized to.

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